Your Child Has An Eating Disorder: Where Can You Find Helpful Resources?

If you suspect your child has an eating disorder, you may feel overwhelmed. There are a few things you should know upfront.

First and foremost, your child is not just trying to be difficult. Eating disorders are serious mental illnesses; they are not a choice. Second, it's not your fault; many different factors come into play when it comes to developing an eating disorder.

Finally, you should know where to find resources to help you and your child deal with this problem.

Online

The internet provides a wealth of resources about eating disorders and is an excellent place to start researching right now. Learn about the different eating disorders, about different behaviors associated with them, and the many health concerns they spark. You can also seek out online support groups so that you can find camaraderie and vent your frustrations.

Apps

If you're trying to help your child recover from an eating disorder, consider using modern technology as a tool. Many apps help people to track their recovery. This close monitoring throughout the day can be beneficial. Not only do apps track progress, but the person recovering can just push a button to get support, tips on how to deal with it when issues arise, or support for when things get tough.

Recovery Record, Rise Up and Recover and Mindshift are all great apps for people with eating disorders, but new apps come out every day.

National

There are several reputable national organizations you may want to look into for help. One that is particularly parent-friendly is the National Eating Disorder Association (NEDA).

If you are looking for more of a one-on-one support system, try contacting the Navigator Program. This program can put you in touch with volunteers who have experience dealing with eating disorders. They will work with your child, or with you if you feel that you need help getting through this difficult time.

Local

Don 't forget that you probably have places you can turn to for assistance with eating disorders right in your home town. Check with your child's doctor, your local hospital, or your child's school guidance counselor to see what kind of support groups or programs may be available to you.

Eating disorders have a way of growing out of control. It can happen over a period of years, or very quickly. One thing is for sure—the sooner you're able to get your child help, the better a chance he or she will have.

Sources: Eating Disorder Hope, The Renfrew Center

Photo: Pexels

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